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Monday, 29 July 2013

Steve Jobs: his 10 most inspirational quotes

Steve Jobs, who has quit as the CEO of Apple, the firm behind the iPhone, is an inspirational speaker and a revolutionary innovator. Here are some of the best things he's said. I challenge you not to read them and feel a response.

QuoteThe only way to do great work is to love what you do...
Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle.
QuoteYou have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down...
[note - this is long but it’s worth it. He's talking about dropping out of university.]
Because I had dropped out and didn't have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this. I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can't capture, and I found it fascinating.
None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, it's likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do. Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later.
Again, you can't connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.
QuoteSometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith...
[on his being fired from Apple in 1984]
I didn't see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.[…] It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it. Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don't lose faith.
QuoteWhen you’re a carpenter making a beautiful chest of drawers, you’re not going to use a piece of plywood on the back...
We think the Mac will sell zillions, but we didn’t build the Mac for anybody else. We built it for ourselves. We were the group of people who were going to judge whether it was great or not. We weren’t going to go out and do market research. We just wanted to build the best thing we could build.
When you’re a carpenter making a beautiful chest of drawers, you’re not going to use a piece of plywood on the back, even though it faces the wall and nobody will ever see it. You’ll know it’s there, so you’re going to use a beautiful piece of wood on the back. For you to sleep well at night, the aesthetic, the quality, has to be carried all the way through.
QuoteGet your thinking clean to make it simple...
Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.
QuoteRemembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose...
Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.
QuoteDeath is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent...
No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don't want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.
QuoteSome people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really how it works...
Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really how it works. The design of the Mac wasn’t what it looked like, although that was part of it. Primarily, it was how it worked. To design something really well, you have to get it. You have to really grok [understand] what it’s all about. It takes a passionate commitment to really thoroughly understand something, chew it up, not just quickly swallow it. Most people don’t take the time to do that.
QuoteBeing the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me...
Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me. Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful... that’s what matters to me.
QuoteStay Hungry. Stay Foolish.
Note – one of Steve Jobs's best speeches was delivered to students at Stanford University at their graduation ceremony, as recognised byStephen Fry.
Some of the best of these quotes are taken from it. Here’s a video and here’s the full text.


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Monday, 22 July 2013

Bill Gates' 11 Rules of Life

BILL GATES' SPEECH TO MT. WHITNEY HIGH SCHOOL in Visalia, California.


Love him or hate him, he sure hits the nail on the head with this!
To anyone with kids of any age, here's some advice. Bill Gates recently gave a speech at a High School about 11 things they did not and will not learn in school. He talks about how feel-good, politically correct teachings created a generation of kids with no concept of reality and how this concept set them up for failure in the real world.
Rule 1: Life is not fair -- get used to it!
Rule 2: The world won't care about your self-esteem. The world will expect you to accomplish something BEFORE you feel good about yourself.
Rule 3: You will NOT make $60,000 a year right out of high school. You won't be a vice-president with a car phone until you earn both.
Rule 4: If you think your teacher is tough, wait till you get a boss.
Rule 5: Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity. Your Grandparents had a different word for burger flipping -- they called it opportunity.
Rule 6: If you mess up, it's not your parents' fault, so don't whine about your mistakes, learn from them.
Rule 7: Before you were born, your parents weren't as boring as they are now. They got that way from paying your bills, cleaning your clothes and listening to you talk about how cool you thought you are. So before you save the rain forest from the parasites of your parent's generation, try delousing the closet in your own room.
Rule 8: Your school may have done away with winners and losers, but life HAS NOT. In some schools they have abolished failing grades and they'll give you as MANY TIMES as you want to get the right answer. This doesn't bear the slightest resemblance to ANYTHING in real life.
Rule 9: Life is not divided into semesters. You don't get summers off and very few employers are interested in helping you FIND YOURSELF. Do that on your own time.
Rule 10: Television is NOT real life. In real life people actually have to leave the coffee shop and go to jobs.
Rule 11: Be nice to nerds. Chances are you'll end up working for one.
IF YOU AGREE PASS IT ON, IF YOU CAN READ THIS THANK A TEACHER!!
इस WEBSITE को और USEFUL बनाने में हमारा सहयोग करें 
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Friday, 19 July 2013

Ratan Tata's words of inspiration

Ratan Naval Tata has been called many things. Quiet. Reticent. Humble. A businessman par excellence. Tenacious. And a tiger, when pushed to the wall.
As we all witnessed when it looked like the controversy about Singur, where the Tata Nano was to be manufactured, looked like escalating instead of dying down.
The 70-year-old roared, "If people say that that we will protect our investments irrespective of anything then they are wrong. I will not bring in my employees to Singur if there is threat of them being beaten up. Tata will do whatever necessary to protect its employees."
It was a statement, not a threat -- a statement that Ratan Tata will not hesitate to execute.
Here are some more inspirational words of wisdom from a titan of India's business world:


  • On courage: I am, unfortunately, a person who has often said: You put a gun to my head and pull the trigger or take the gun away, I won't move my head.
  • On successful people: I admire people who are very successful. But if that success has been achieved through too much ruthlessness, then I may admire that person, but I can't respect him.
  • On leadership: It is easy to become a number one player, but it is difficult to remain number one. So, we will have to fight with a view to remain number one.
  • On Nano: This project (the Nano) has proven to everyone that if you really set yourself to doing something, you actually can do it.
  • On the need to think big: We have been. . . thinking small. And if we look around us, countries like China have grown so much by thinking big. I would urge that we all, in the coming years, think big, think of doing things not in small increments, not in small deltas, but seemingly impossible things. But nothing is impossible if you really set out to do so. And we act boldly. Because it is this thinking big and acting boldly that will move India up in a manner different from where it is today.
  • On risk: Risk is a necessary part of business philosophy. You can be risk-averse and take no risks, in which case you will have a certain trajectory in terms of your growth. Or you can, while being prudent, take greater risk in order to grow faster.


  • On risk: I view risk as an ability to be where no one has been before. I view risk to be an issue of thinking big, something we did not do previously. We did everything in small increments so we always lagged behind. But the crucial question is: can we venture putting a man on the moon or risk billions of rupees on a really way-out, advanced project in, say, superconductors? Do you restrict your risk to something close to your heart?


    Source : rediff business desk
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    Friday, 12 July 2013

    Life lessons from Narayana Murthy


    N R Narayana Murthy, chief mentor and chairman of the board, Infosys Technologies, delivered a pre-commencement lecture at the New York University (Stern School of Business) on May 9. It is a scintillating speech, Murthy speaks about the lessons he learnt from his life and career. We present it for our readers:

    Dean Cooley, faculty, staff, distinguished guests, and, most importantly, the graduating class of 2007, it is a great privilege to speak at your commencement ceremonies.
    I thank Dean Cooley and Prof Marti Subrahmanyam for their kind invitation. I am exhilarated to be part of such a joyous occasion. Congratulations to you, the class of 2007, on completing an important milestone in your life journey.
    After some thought, I have decided to share with you some of my life lessons. I learned these lessons in the context of my early career struggles, a life lived under the influence of sometimes unplanned events which were the crucibles that tempered my character and reshaped my future.
    I would like first to share some of these key life events with you, in the hope that these may help you understand my struggles and how chance events and unplanned encounters with influential persons shaped my life and career.
    Later, I will share the deeper life lessons that I have learned. My sincere hope is that this sharing will help you see your own trials and tribulations for the hidden blessings they can be.
    The first event occurred when I was a graduate student in Control Theory at IIT, Kanpur, in India. At breakfast on a bright Sunday morning in 1968, I had a chance encounter with a famous computer scientist on sabbatical from a well-known US university.
    He was discussing exciting new developments in the field of computer science with a large group of students and how such developments would alter our future. He was articulate, passionate and quite convincing. I was hooked. I went straight from breakfast to the library, read four or five papers he had suggested, and left the library determined to study computer science.
    Friends, when I look back today at that pivotal meeting, I marvel at how one role model can alter for the better the future of a young student. This experience taught me that valuable advice can sometimes come from an unexpected source, and chance events can sometimes open new doors.
    The next event that left an indelible mark on me occurred in 1974. The location: Nis, a border town between former Yugoslavia, now Serbia, and Bulgaria. I was hitchhiking from Paris back to Mysore, India, my home town.
    By the time a kind driver dropped me at Nis railway station at 9 p.m. on a Saturday night, the restaurant was closed. So was the bank the next morning, and I could not eat because I had no local money. I slept on the railway platform until 8.30 pm in the night when the Sofia Express pulled in.
    The only passengers in my compartment were a girl and a boy. I struck a conversation in French with the young girl. She talked about the travails of living in an iron curtain country, until we were roughly interrupted by some policemen who, I later gathered, were summoned by the young man who thought we were criticising the communist government of Bulgaria.
    The girl was led away; my backpack and sleeping bag were confiscated. I was dragged along the platform into a small 8x8 foot room with a cold stone floor and a hole in one corner by way of toilet facilities. I was held in that bitterly cold room without food or water for over 72 hours.
    I had lost all hope of ever seeing the outside world again, when the door opened. I was again dragged out unceremoniously, locked up in the guard's compartment on a departing freight train and told that I would be released 20 hours later upon reaching Istanbul. The guard's final words still ring in my ears  --  "You are from a friendly country called India and that is why we are letting you go!"
    The journey to Istanbul was lonely, and I was starving. This long, lonely, cold journey forced me to deeply rethink my convictions about Communism. Early on a dark Thursday morning, after being hungry for 108 hours, I was purged of any last vestiges of affinity for the Left.
    I concluded that entrepreneurship, resulting in large-scale job creation, was the only viable mechanism for eradicating poverty in societies.
    Deep in my heart, I always thank the Bulgarian guards for transforming me from a confused Leftist into a determined, compassionate capitalist! Inevitably, this sequence of events led to the eventual founding of Infosys in 1981.
    While these first two events were rather fortuitous, the next two, both concerning the Infosys journey, were more planned and profoundly influenced my career trajectory.
    On a chilly Saturday morning in winter 1990, five of the seven founders of Infosys met in our small office in a leafy Bangalore suburb. The decision at hand was the possible sale of Infosys for the enticing sum of $1 million. After nine years of toil in the then business-unfriendly India, we were quite happy at the prospect of seeing at least some money.
    I let my younger colleagues talk about their future plans. Discussions about the travails of our journey thus far and our future challenges went on for about four hours. I had not yet spoken a word.
    Finally, it was my turn. I spoke about our journey from a small Mumbai apartment in 1981 that had been beset with many challenges, but also of how I believed we were at the darkest hour before the dawn. I then took an audacious step. If they were all bent upon selling the company, I said, I would buy out all my colleagues, though I did not have a cent in my pocket.
    There was a stunned silence in the room. My colleagues wondered aloud about my foolhardiness. But I remained silent. However, after an hour of my arguments, my colleagues changed their minds to my way of thinking. I urged them that if we wanted to create a great company, we should be optimistic and confident. They have more than lived up to their promise of that day.
    In the seventeen years since that day, Infosys has grown to revenues in excess of $3.0 billion, a net income of more than $800 million and a market capitalisation of more than $28 billion, 28,000 times richer than the offer of $1 million on that day.
    In the process, Infosys has created more than 70,000 well-paying jobs, 2,000-plus dollar-millionaires and 20,000-plus rupee millionaires.
    A final story: On a hot summer morning in 1995, a Fortune-10 corporation had sequestered all their Indian software vendors, including Infosys, in different rooms at the Taj Residency hotel in Bangalore so that the vendors could not communicate with one another. This customer's propensity for tough negotiations was well-known. Our team was very nervous.
    First of all, with revenues of only around $5 million, we were minnows compared to the customer.
    Second, this customer contributed fully 25% of our revenues. The loss of this business would potentially devastate our recently-listed company.
    Third, the customer's negotiation style was very aggressive. The customer team would go from room to room, get the best terms out of each vendor and then pit one vendor against the other. This went on for several rounds. Our various arguments why a fair price  --  one that allowed us to invest in good people, R&D, infrastructure, technology and training -- was actually in their interest failed to cut any ice with the customer.
    By 5 p.m. on the last day, we had to make a decision right on the spot whether to accept the customer's terms or to walk out.
    All eyes were on me as I mulled over the decision. I closed my eyes, and reflected upon our journey until then. Through many a tough call, we had always thought about the long-term interests of Infosys. I communicated clearly to the customer team that we could not accept their terms, since it could well lead us to letting them down later. But I promised a smooth, professional transition to a vendor of customer's choice.
    This was a turning point for Infosys.
    Subsequently, we created a Risk Mitigation Council which ensured that we would never again depend too much on any one client, technology, country, application area or key employee. The crisis was a blessing in disguise. Today, Infosys has a sound de-risking strategy that has stabilised its revenues and profits.
    I want to share with you, next, the life lessons these events have taught me.
    1. I will begin with the importance of learning from experience. It is less important, I believe, where you start. It is more important how and what you learn. If the quality of the learning is high, the development gradient is steep, and, given time, you can find yourself in a previously unattainable place. I believe the Infosys story is living proof of this.
    Learning from experience, however, can be complicated. It can be much more difficult to learn from success than from failure. If we fail, we think carefully about the precise cause. Success can indiscriminately reinforce all our prior actions.
    2. A second theme concerns the power of chance events. As I think across a wide variety of settings in my life, I am struck by the incredible role played by the interplay of chance events with intentional choices. While the turning points themselves are indeed often fortuitous, how we respond to them is anything but so. It is this very quality of how we respond systematically to chance events that is crucial.
    3. Of course, the mindset one works with is also quite critical. As recent work by the psychologist, Carol Dweck, has shown, it matters greatly whether one believes in ability as inherent or that it can be developed. Put simply, the former view, a fixed mindset, creates a tendency to avoid challenges, to ignore useful negative feedback and leads such people to plateau early and not achieve their full potential.
    The latter view, a growth mindset, leads to a tendency to embrace challenges, to learn from criticism and such people reach ever higher levels of achievement (Krakovsky, 2007: page 48).
    4. The fourth theme is a cornerstone of the Indian spiritual tradition: self-knowledge. Indeed, the highest form of knowledge, it is said, is self-knowledge. I believe this greater awareness and knowledge of oneself is what ultimately helps develop a more grounded belief in oneself, courage, determination, and, above all, humility, all qualities which enable one to wear one's success with dignity and grace.
    Based on my life experiences, I can assert that it is this belief in learning from experience, a growth mindset, the power of chance events, and self-reflection that have helped me grow to the present.
    Back in the 1960s, the odds of my being in front of you today would have been zero. Yet here I stand before you! With every successive step, the odds kept changing in my favour, and it is these life lessons that made all the difference.
    My young friends, I would like to end with some words of advice. Do you believe that your future is pre-ordained, and is already set? Or, do you believe that your future is yet to be written and that it will depend upon the sometimes fortuitous events?
    Do you believe that these events can provide turning points to which you will respond with your energy and enthusiasm? Do you believe that you will learn from these events and that you will reflect on your setbacks? Do you believe that you will examine your successes with even greater care?
    I hope you believe that the future will be shaped by several turning points with great learning opportunities. In fact, this is the path I have walked to much advantage.
    A final word: When, one day, you have made your mark on the world, remember that, in the ultimate analysis, we are all mere temporary custodians of the wealth we generate, whether it be financial, intellectual, or emotional. The best use of all your wealth is to share it with those less fortunate.
    I believe that we have all at some time eaten the fruit from trees that we did not plant. In the fullness of time, when it is our turn to give, it behooves us in turn to plant gardens that we may never eat the fruit of, which will largely benefit generations to come. I believe this is our sacred responsibility, one that I hope you will shoulder in time.
    Thank you for your patience. Go forth and embrace your future with open arms, and pursue enthusiastically your own life journey of discovery!

    Source: rediffmail.com
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    Sunday, 7 July 2013

    Dhirubhai Ambani : Acceptance Speech at Economic Times Lifetime Achievement Award (2001)

    Dhirajlal Hirachand Ambani (December 28,1932 - July 6, 2002)
    Dhirajlal Hirachand Ambani  is well  known as Dhirubhai Ambani. A son of poor village school teacher from Gujarat had millions of dreams. He perused his dreams resulted in contributing to the Indian economy. The story of Dhirajlal Hirachand Ambani  gives  inspires youth in perusing there great dreams .
    The book ‘Rags to riches’ covers the life history of the Dhirubhai Ambani and the Reliance Family.
    Following is the acceptance speech given by Dhirajlal Hirachand Ambani during Economic Times – Lifetime Achievement Award.
    Honourable Finance Minister Yashwant Sinha ji, respected Dr. Kurien, chairman of the jury Shri Deepak Parekh, Shri Amitabh Bachchan, Shri Samir Jain and Ladies and Gentlemen,
    I would like to thank The Economic Times for this prestigious award. These days an award for a positive achievement is ‘news’
    by itself.
    Coming from a leading newspaper it is a great honor indeed. A leader focuses on the positive and encourages it. And Economic Times, we know, is the leader.
    I would like to thank the jury and The Economic Times for bestowing this honor upon me.
    This award has been earned by the entire Reliance family. It consists of thousands of employees who work with total dedication. Managers who are ‘owners’ of operations under their charge. Business associates who share Reliance’s commitment to customers and investors. And millions of investors who have unshakable faith in “Reliance”. They are the pillars of my achievements. They are my family.
    I am proud of this family. With great humility I accept this award on their behalf.
    I accept the award as the son of a village school teacher from Gujarat. For me, this award has one simple message. For those who dare to dream, there is a whole world to win.
    Today, I would like to share this message with all young Indians: Dream and dare.
    My message is very simple:
    Let no one demoralize you.
    Do not allow any one to deter you.
    Pursue your goal, even in the face of difficulties. Convert difficulties into opportunities.
    Keep your morale high, inspite of setbacks.
    At the end, you are bound to succeed.
    Often friends ask me,
    Have I achieved all that I wanted?
    The simple reply is : No. There are many more miles to go.
    What has been achieved is history. I only believe in looking at the future.
    I still cherish several dreams:
    The dream of assured water supply for all our villages.
    The dream of a manifold increase in our agriculture output.
    The dream of connecting all our villages with the rest of the world.
    The dream of giving world-class education.
    The dream of providing millions of jobs.
    The dream of winning a war against diseases and malnutrition.
    The dream of employing the latest science and technology.
    All for the people of India.
    In short, I dream of India becoming a great economic superpower.
    Undoubtedly this dream has yet to become a reality.
    The question is : What should we do to realize this dream?
    First, we must know the problems. However, it is even more important to know the solutions. Let us acquire knowledge and then apply it. Knowledge is the key to greatness.
    Second, we must respect creators of wealth. Unfortunately, creators of wealth are ridiculed in our country.
    A farmer is dismissed as an ‘illiterate’. Lip service is paid to him only because he is a voter.
    A worker is condemned as a troublemaker.
    Businessmen are labelled as crooks.
    Those who do not produce wealth discredit those who create wealth.
    This attitude kills the productive spirit.
    A society, which condemns creators of wealth will always remain poor and miserable.
    Acquisition of knowledge and creation of wealth are part of our culture: That is why we worship Saraswati as well as Lakshmi.
    Third, we must learn to trust. For several centuries, Indians have been brainwashed to distrust other Indians. This saps national energy. Distrust kills initiative. Distrust compels people to maneuver and manipulate. Trust and transparency stimulates entrepreneurship.
    If India wants to be a great nation, we must have the courage to trust. This is my sincere belief.
    We must learn the difference between a mistake and a crime.
    We must have the wisdom to correct and encourage.
    Fourth, we must always go for the best. Do not compromise on quality. Reject if it is not the best – not only the best in India, but globally.
    Friends,
    These principles have guided me in my life’s journey – from a village school boy in Gujarat to the metropolis of Mumbai via Aden.
    I have trusted people and they have put their trust in me.
    I have encouraged youth, and they have never let me down.
    I have asked my people to take initiative and to take risks. It has paid me rich dividends.
    I insist on excellence. This helps us to be leaders.
    Reliance is built on some of these principles. I sincerely believe that these are the principles that can help us to build a greater India.
    Ladies and Gentlemen,
    These are exciting times. Times of change and transition. We cannot afford to be complacent. These are times of big challenges.
    These are also times of great opportunities.
    Let us seize them. For this, we must change and discard old attitudes.
    We must forge a new partnership for a great India. A strong and constructive partnership between industry, government and society.
    We must learn to work together and reject the negative mindset.
    We can then prove to the world that India can do it. That Indians are not afraid of competition. That India is a nation of achievers.
    This is the legacy I would like to leave behind.
    Thank you.
    Dhirubhai H. Ambani
    Chairman, Reliance Industries Limited
    Acceptance speech: Economic Times – Lifetime Achievement Award (10-Aug-2001)
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    Thursday, 4 July 2013

    Motivational Speech by Azim Premji

    Ajim H. Premji
    You should dare to dream, define what you stand for, never lose your zest and curiosity, always strive for excellence, build self confidence, learn to work in teams, take care of yourself, preserve, have a broader social vision and finally never let success go to your head
    – Wipro chairman Azim H Premji, one of India’s most successful entrepreneurs, on Friday prescribed a 10-point recipe for success, based on the very lessons he had learnt during his last 35 years in the organization.

    “You should dare to dream, define what you stand for, never lose your zest and curiosity, always strive for excellence, build self confidence, learn to work in teams, take care of yourself, preserve, have a broader social vision and finally never let success go to your head,” Premji said.

    The Wipro chairman was delivering the convocation address at the 38 the convocation of the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras. Following is the entire text of the convocation address made by Premji:

    I am privileged to be with you here today and to share this significant moment of your life. The convocation marks the culmination of all the endless nights you worked through, all the anxieties you have gone through facing one examination after another and all the preparation you have put in, not only to enter this prestigious institution but also to graduate from it successfully. It is no mean achievement.

    Only a handful of the most talented people in the world have shared this success with you. Let me just say that I am very proud of each and every one of you.

    I am a little wary about giving you advice- because advice is one thing young people all over the world do not like receiving. I cannot fault you for that.

    The world does look very different when it is seen with your eyes. You are filled with enthusiasm and are straining at the leash to get on with life.

    And the world is very different from what it was when I was at your age. Never before has the role of technology been so pervasive and so central. The Internet has breached all physical borders and connected the world together like no other force has done before.

    For the first time, opportunities for creating wealth in India are at par with the best in world. There is no need for you to sacrifice the joy of remaining in your own country any more.

    All opportunities are accompanied by their own challenges. I thought I would share with you a few of the lessons I have learnt in my own life, while loading the transformation at Wipro, from a small company three and a half decades back into a global corporation listed on the New York Stock Exchange. I hope you find them useful.

    Lesson # 1: Dare to dream

    When I entered Wipro at the age of 21, it was a sudden and unexpected event. I had no warning of what lay ahead of me and I was caught completely unprepared. All I had with me was a dream, a dream of building a great Organization. It compensated for my inexperience and I guess, also prevented me from being overwhelmed by the enormity of the task before me. What I am happy is that we never stopped dreaming. Even when we achieved a position of leadership in every business we operated in India. We now have a dream of becoming one of the top 10 global it service companies.

    Many people wonder whether having unrealistic dreams is foolish. My reply to that is dreams by themselves can never be realistic or safe. If they were, they would not be dreams. I do agree that one must have strategies to execute dreams. And, of course, one must slog to transform dreams into reality. But dreams come first.

    What saddens me most is to see young, bright people getting completely disillusioned by a few initial setbacks and slowly turning cynical and some of them want to migrate to America in the hope this is the solution. It requires courage to keep dreaming. And that is when dreams are most needed- not when everything is going right, but when just about everything is going wrong.

    Lesson # 2: Define what you stand for while success is important, it can become enduring only if it is built on a strong foundation of Values.
    Define what you stand for as early as possible and do not compromise with it for any reason. Nobody can enjoy the fruits of success if you have to argue with your own conscience. In Wipro, we defined our Beliefs long before it became a fashion to do so. It not only helped us in becoming more resilient to stand up to crises we faced along the way, but it also helped us in attracting the right kind of people.

    Eventually, we realized that our values made eminent business sense. Values help in clarifying what everyone should do or not do in any business situation. It saves enormous time and effort because each issue does not have to be individually debated at length. But remember that values are meaningful only if you practice them. People may listen to what you say but they will believe what you do. Values are a matter of trust. They must be reflected in each one of your actions. Trust takes a long time to build but can be lost quickly by just one inconsistent act.

    Lesson #3: Never lose your zest and curiosity

     All the available knowledge in the world is accelerating at a phenomenal rate. The whole world’s codified knowledge base (all documented information in library books and electronic files) doubled every 30 years in the early 20th century.

    By the 1970s, the world’s knowledge base doubled every seven years. Information researchers predict that by the year 2010, the world’s codified knowledge will double every 11 hours. Remaining on top of what you need to know will become one of the greatest challenges for you. The natural zest and curiosity for learning is one of the greatest drivers for keeping updated on knowledge. A child’s curiosity is insatiable because every new object is a thing of wonder and mystery. The same zest is needed to keep learning new things. I personally spend at least ten hours every week on reading. If I do not do that, I find myself quickly outdated.

    Lesson # 4: Always strive for excellence

    There is a tremendous difference between being good and being excellent in whatever you do. In the world of tomorrow, just being good is not good enough. One of the greatest advantages of globalization is that it has brought in completely different standards. Being the best in the country is not enough; one has to be the best in the world. Excellence is a moving target. One has to constantly raise the bar.

    In the knowledge-based industries, India has the unique advantage of being a quality leader. Just like Japan was able to win in the overseas market with its quality leadership in automobile manufacturing, India has been able to do the same in information technology.

    At Wipro, we treat quality as the #1 priority. This enabled us not only to become the world’s first SEI CMM Level 5 software services company in the world but also a leader in Six Sigma approach to quality in India. However, even today I am dissatisfied with several things, which we are not doing right in the area of customer satisfaction. Doing something excellently has its own intrinsic joy, which I think is the greatest benefit of Quality.

    Lesson # 5: Build self-confidence

    Self-confidence comes from a positive attitude even in adverse situations. Self-confident people assume responsibility for their mistakes and share credit with their team members. They are able to distinguish between what is in their control and what is not. They do not waste their energies on events that are outside their control and hence they can take setbacks in their stride. Remember, no one can make you feel inferior without your consent.

    Lesson # 6: Learn to work in teams

    The challenges ahead are so complex that no individual will be able to face them alone. While most of our education is focused in individual strength, teaming with others is equally important. You cannot fire a missile from a canoe. Unless you build a strong network of people with complimentary skills, you will be restricted by your own limitations. Globalization has brought in people of different origin, different upbringing and different cultures together. Ability to become an integral part of a cross-cultural team will be a must for your success.

    Lesson # 7 Take care of yourself

    The stress that a young person faces today while beginning his or her career is the same as the last generation faced at the time of retirement. I have myself found that my job has become enormously more complex over the last two or three years. Along with mutual alertness, physical fitness will also assume a great importance in your life. You must develop your own mechanism for dealing with stress. I have found that a daily jog for me goes a long way in releasing the pressure and building up energy. You will need lots of energy to deal with the challenges. Unless you take care of yourself there is no way you can take care of others.

    Lesson # 8: Persevere

    Finally, no matter what you decide to do in your life, you must persevere. Keep at it and you will succeed, no matter how hopeless it seems at times. In the last three and half decades, we have gone through many difficult times. But we have found that if we remain true to what we believe in, we can surmount every difficulty that comes in the way.

    I remember reading this very touching story on perseverance. An eight-year-old child heard her parents talking about her little brother. All she knew was that he was very sick and they had no money left. They were moving to a smaller house because they could not afford to stay in the present house after paying the doctor’s bills. Only a very costly surgery could save him now and there was no one to loan them the money. When she heard daddy say to her tearful mother with whispered desperation, ‘Only a miracle can save him now’, the child went to her bedroom and pulled a glass jar from its hiding place in the closet. She poured all the change out on the floor and counted it carefully. Clutching the precious jar tightly, she slipped out the back door and made her way six blocks to the local drug Store. She took a quarter from her jar and placed it on the glass counter. “And what do you want?” asked the pharmacist. “It’s for my little brother,” the girl answered back. “He’s really, really sick and I want to buy a miracle.” “I beg your pardon?” said the pharmacist. “His name is Andrew and he has something bad growing inside his head and my daddy says only a miracle can save him. So how much does a miracle cost?” We don’t sell miracles here, child. I’m sorry,” the pharmacist said, smiling sadly at the little girl. “Listen, I have the money to pay for it. If it isn’t enough, I can try and get some more. Just tell me how much it costs.” In the shop was a well-dressed customer. He stooped down and asked the little girl, “What kind of a miracle does you brother need?” I don’t know,” she replied with her eyes welling up. “He’s really sick and mommy says he needs an operation. But my daddy can’t pay for it, so I have brought my savings”.  “How much do you have?” asked the man. “One dollar and eleven cents, but I can try and get some more”, she answered barely audibly. “Well, what a coincidence,” smiled the man. “A dollar and eleven cents — the exact price of a miracle for little brothers.” He took her money in one hand and held her hand with the other. He said, “Take me to where you live. I want to see your brother and meet your parents. Let’s see if I have the kind of miracle you need.” That well-dressed man was Dr Carlton Armstrong, a surgeon, specializing in neuro-surgery. The operation was completed without charge and it wasn’t long before Andrew was home again and doing well. “That surgery,” her mom whispered, “was a real miracle. I wonder how much it would have cost?” The little girl smiled. She knew exactly how much the miracle cost … one dollar and eleven cents … plus the faith of a little child. Perseverance can make miracles happen.

    Lesson # 9: Have a broader social vision

    For decades we have been waiting for some one who will help us in ‘priming the pump’ of the economy. The government was the logical choice for doing it, but it was strapped for resources. Other countries were willing to give us loans and aids but there was a limit to this. In the millennium of the mind, knowledge-based industries like Information Technology are in a unique position to earn wealth from outside. While earning is important, we must have Mechanisms by which we use it for the larger good of our society. Through the Azim Premji Foundation, we have targeted over the next 12 months to enroll over a million children, who are out of school due to economic or social reasons.  I personally believe that the greatest gift one can give to others is the gift of education. We who have been so fortunate to receive this gift know how valuable it is.

    Lesson # 10: Never let success go to your head

    No matter what we achieve, it is important to remember that we owe this success to many factors and people outside us. This will not only help us in keeping our sense of modesty and humility intact but also help us to retain our sense of proportion and balance. The moment we allow success to build a feeling or arrogance, we become vulnerable to making bad judgments. 

    Let me illustrate this with another story:
    A lady in faded dress and her husband, dressed in a threadbare suit, walked in without an appointment into the office of the president of the most prestigious educational institution in America. The secretary frowned at them and said, “He will be busy all day.” “We will wait,” said the couple quietly. The secretary ignored them for hours hoping they will go away. But they did not. Finally, the secretary decided to disturb the president, hoping they will go way quickly once they meet him.

    The president took one look at the faded dresses and glared sternly at them. The lady said, “Our son studied here and he was very happy. A year ago, he was killed in an accident. My husband and I would like to erect a memorial for him on the campus.” The president was not touched. He was shocked. “Madam, we cannot put up a statue for every student of ours who died. This place would look like a cemetery.” “Oh, no,” the lady explained quickly, “We don’t want to erect a statue. We thought we would give a building to you.” “A building?” exclaimed the president, looking at their worn out clothes. “Do you have any idea how much a building costs? Our buildings cost close to ten million dollars!” The lady was silent. The president was pleased and thought this would get rid of them. The lady looked at her husband. “If that is what it costs to start a university, why don’t we start our own?” Her husband nodded. Mr. and Mrs. Leland Stanford walked away, traveling to Palo Alto, California, where they established the university as a memorial to their son, bearing their name – the Stanford University. The story goes that this is how Stanford University began.

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